Monday, May 20, 2019

Mayor de Blasio Puts Trump Org on Notice: Cut Greenhouse Emissions or Face Big Penalties

Mayor De Blasio. (City Hall Press Office Photo)
NEW YORK—Mayor de Blasio recently put President Trump on notice for the millions of dollars his properties will owe under new climate change legislation that requires large buildings in New York City to dramatically cut their greenhouse gas emissions. The law, a world-first, took effect on May 17th, 2019 and is a central component of New York City’s Green New Deal. Our Green New Deal will create new jobs and build a fairer and healthier city for all New Yorkers, making the city carbon-neutral by 2050.

Across New York City, Trump owns at least 8 large buildings that do not meet 2030 emissions levels under the law. These dirty, inefficient buildings pump approximately 27,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases into our air each year, the equivalent of 5,800 cars. If Trump does not clean up these buildings, he will owe approximately $2.1 million in fines every year starting in 2030.

"Our message is loud and clear,” said Mayor de Blasio. “We’re tackling climate change head-on with NYC’s Green New Deal and are the first city in the world to require all big buildings to cut their emissions, with the goal of a carbon neutral city by 2050. President Trump – you’re on notice. Your polluting buildings are part of the problem. Cut your emissions or pay the price.”

The following Trump properties do not comply with new emission standards in New York City:
  • Trump International Hotel & Tower, 1 Central Park West
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $850,871 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Building, 40 Wall Street
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $164,565 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump World Tower, 845 United Nations Plaza No. 37-B
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $212,121 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Tower, 721 Fifth Avenue
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $469,848 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Park Avenue, 502 Park Avenue
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $126,316 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Parc, 106 Central Park South
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $40,360 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Parc East, 100 Central Park South
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $26,629 per year if no improvements made
  • Trump Palace, 200 East 69th Street
  • Estimated 2030 fine: $239,315 per year if no improvements made

Reducing emissions from buildings is a key strategy for implementing New York City’s ambitious Green New Deal and upholding the highest goals of the Paris Agreement to limit global temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Meeting these goals will require ending our reliance on polluting fossil fuels and deep reductions in greenhouse gases across our building, transportation, and waste sectors. By putting into action a bold vision that meets the challenges of climate change and inequality, New York City is demonstrating what the Green New Deal looks like in practice.

New York City’s Green New Deal attacks global warming on all fronts. It is comprised of $14 billion in new and committed investments, legislation and concrete action at the City level that will ensure a nearly 30 percent additional reduction in emissions by 2030. In addition to the building mandates legislation, it includes other initiatives to reduce emissions, a plan to switch city government operations to clean electricity, banning new inefficient glass buildings, and committing the city to carbon neutrality by 2050.

Over many decades of study, scientists have reached an overwhelming consensus that climate change is occurring now and is caused by human activities. Extreme weather events, which are growing in frequency and severity around the world, demonstrate the consequences of a warming planet and the risks associated with climate denial. In New York City, Hurricane Sandy resulted in the deaths of 44 New Yorkers and caused $19 billion in damages and lost economic activity. Projections show that a Sandy-like storm in the 2050s could cause $90 billion in damage and economic loss, nearly five times Sandy’s impact.

In New York City, buildings are responsible for nearly 70 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions. Cleaning up the city’s largest buildings—and its largest polluters—will promote energy efficiency, electrification, and renewable energy while creating new, good-paying jobs for New Yorkers. It will also discourage continued reliance on polluting fossil fuels, cut down on harmful air pollution, and save building owners money over time by lowering operating expenses.

After being passed by the New York City Council on April 18, 2019, Intro 1253 will become law on May 17, 2019.

Reducing emissions from buildings is a key strategy for achieving New York City’s ambitious climate change goals of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 and upholding the highest goals of the Paris Agreement.