September 8, 2016

Mayor de Blasio Signs Legislation Expanding Administration's Labor Policy Efforts to Continue Supporting Caregivers

Also signs package of legislation coordinating efforts to address communities’ quality of life, and to support individuals released from prison


NEW YORK––Mayor Bill de Blasio recently held public hearings for and signed 10 pieces of legislation. Among the legislation signed were Intros. 1081-0A and 1084-A, two bills which will expand labor policy efforts to support caregivers.
“Intros. 1081-A and 1084-A allow us to address the needs of some of our most vulnerable New Yorkers – paid and unpaid caregivers,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “By requiring the Department for the Aging to develop and conduct a survey of unpaid caregivers, and by establishing a new Division of Paid Care, we will work to identify the needs of some of the most vital members of New York City’s workforce. I’d like to thank Council Members Chin and Cohen for sponsoring these bills, and Council Speaker Mark-Viverito for her leadership.”
The first bill, Intro. 1081-A, requires the Department for the Aging to develop and conduct a survey of unpaid caregivers. As a result of the survey, DFTA will submit a plan on how to address the needs of unpaid caregivers, and will report on progress made in accordance with that plan in two years. This report will be updated every five years.
The second bill, Intro. 1084-A, establishes a new Division of Paid Care within the Department of Consumer Affairs' Office of Labor Policy and Standards. The Division will focus on the needs of paid caregivers, such as domestic workers and home health aides, who are often women and immigrants, and are in need of a trusted resource and specialized education efforts. The Division will be responsible for assisting the Director of the Office of Labor Standards with developing policies and programs that apply to paid care workers; conducting public outreach and information campaigns for paid care workers, employers, and care recipients; engaging in and promoting research on the paid care industry; and coordinating with appropriate stakeholders to provide development programming and training. This will expand upon the Administration’s labor policy and enforcement work and will, for the first time ever, establish a dedicated City resource to addressing the specific needs of paid caregivers, who are among the most vulnerable members of New York City’s labor force.
The third bill, Intro. 1085-A, requires the Department of Consumer Affairs to provide outreach and education on consumer protection issues that affect women. DCA will provide information regarding short- and long- term financial planning, including planning for retirement and the navigation of public benefits programs. Additionally, the agency would provide information about the prevalence of gender-based pricing, how to avoid deceptive business practices and predatory consumer and financial products, as well as the availability of counseling services at our Financial Empowerment Centers. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Laurie A. Cumbo.
The fourth bill, Intro. 1086-A, requires the Department of Consumer Affairs to provide seniors with outreach and education regarding consumer protection issues. DCA will provide seniors information regarding telemarketing and internet fraud, Social Security, Medicare, and healthcare fraud, reverse mortgage products, investment schemes, and the services available at our Financial Empowerment Centers. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Chaim M. Deutsch.
The fifth bill, Intro. 1087-A, requires the Department of Consumer Affairs to provide outreach and education on consumer protection issues that affect immigrants. DCA will provide immigrant New Yorkers information regarding IDNYC, including how it can be used to open bank accounts, the risks and consequences of using non-bank institutions such as check cashers, money transfer companies and other similar financial institutions, information about state and local laws regulating employment and immigration assistance services, federal and state laws regulating tax preparers, and the services available at our Financial Empowerment Centers. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Rafael Espinal. Intros. 1085-A, 1086-A and 1087-A ensure that the City is doing everything it can to protect New York City’s consumers and workers with respect to addressing variety of challenges: from facilitating financial planning and guarding against fraud, in addition to being aware of rights under our City’s expanding labor laws, including the Paid Sick Leave and Commuter Benefits Laws.
The sixth bill, Intro. 1135-A, relates to improving “quality of life” conditions in designated communities through inter-agency collaboration. Based on input from community representatives, a coordinating agency will develop a list of at least 3 community areas that would benefit from inter-agency collaboration to address and improve “quality of life” conditions in those areas. Quality of life conditions may relate to sanitation, social services, transportation, public health or public safety. The coordinating agency will work with other agencies to address the quality of life conditions in the identified areas, and provide annual written reports about implementation. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Speaker Melissa Mark Viverito.
The seventh bill, Intro. 1150-A, establishes the Municipal Division of Transitional Services in the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice. This office will ensure the availability of effective reentry services for those who have been incarcerated. It will also issue an annual report on its services, outreach efforts, and the populations and neighborhoods it has served. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Corey Johnson. Intros. 1135-A and 1150-A coordinate efforts to support individuals released from jail and prison.
The eighth bill, Intro. 507-A, reconstitutes our City’s Waterfront Management Advisory Board (WMAB). The WMAB advises the City on the most effective ways to revitalize and protect waterfront and coastal communities. This bill expands membership of the Board to include 18 members of the public, appointed by the Mayor and the Speaker. They will include representatives of local community organizations and advocates who want to see greater development along the waterfront. That could mean anything from more housing to more recreational opportunities. Through OneNYC, the City has already made great progress across the City’s 520 miles of coastline. The City has begun half-hour round-the-clock SI ferry service while also investing in a new citywide ferry service. In addition, the City is creating the BQX to connect more neighborhoods to more jobs as well as strengthening public housing in flood-prone areas. As this Administration builds a more sustainable, resilient and equitable waterfront across the 5 boroughs, it will also be counting on the voices of New Yorkers to help. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Ben Kallos and co-Prime sponsor Deborah Rose, Chair of the Committee on Waterfronts.
The ninth bill, Intro. 446-A, will help protect our harbor water from oil and natural gas waste. It bans certain oil and natural gas-related wastes from being released into any “surface” body of water in our city – including our rivers and bays. It also prohibits using such waste on any city road or real property, and in any city landfill. Waste created from oil and natural gas production, including hydrofracking, is a threat to our environment and health. So it has no place anywhere in this city. New York City does not use these harmful byproducts for anything, including snow removal or de-icing. While New York State’s hydro-fracking ban was necessary to preserve the City’s water quality and infrastructure, this bill will further protect our water from toxic chemicals. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Steve Levin.
The tenth bill, Intro. 1194, makes a technical change to Local Law 57 clarifying the responsibilities of youth baseball leagues with respect to defibrillators. Local Law 57 of 2016 required defibrillators at baseball fields where youth leagues play. It also required the City to provide the defibrillators to these leagues, as well as training on how to use them. This clarifies that this requirement only extends to leagues that receive a sufficient number of automated external defibrillators and training courses from the City free of charge. In his remarks, the Mayor thanked the bill’s sponsor, Council Member Steven Matteo.

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